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Browsing: 1L Year

In this post, we are going to take a look at dropout rates for law schools. Dropouts are significant because generally, they mean one or both of a couple things: either the student feels him or herself unequal to the challenge presented by the law school environment, or the prospect of mounting debt and a poor employment outlook compel the student to bail out. In either case, dropouts are left having paid a significant sum for no tangible benefit. Needless to say, in an ideal system there would be few to no dropouts. That isn’t the system we have. Although…

UPDATED FOR 2018-2019! Glannon Guide to Torts: Learning Torts Through Multiple-Choice Questions and Analysis The most commonly recommended supplement for 1L torts class is Glannon’s Guide to Torts. It’s best thought of as a concise version of the E&E and while it will be very useful for exam study, it’s also a great pre-class primer. Glannon is THE MAN when it comes to 1L exam prep, so he also wrote the E&E for torts. As such, getting both of these might be a little redundant. Also, let’s face it, the E&E is often too long to work through all the…

Civil procedure is usually offered during your first semester of 1L year, so it’s where many students first get acquainted with legal reasoning. At my school, UChicago, where we were on the quarter system, Civ Pro 1 was one of only two exams we had our first quarter. As such, all of us over-studied horribly for it, because we didn’t yet know where to say enough is enough. Despite consulting a lot of resources, my study group agreed that only a couple of the supplements we checked were outstanding. Here are the best civ pro supplements: Civil Procedure: Examples and Explanations (Examples…

Chirelstein’s Concepts and Case Analysis in the Law of Contracts There is no disagreement among law students about this: the best contract law supplement is Chirelstein’s Concepts and Case Analysis in the Law of Contracts (more often referred too as just “Chirelstein” or, “the book with the sailboat”). Whereas in other subjects the examples and explanations series of supplements is often the only way to go, for contracts Chirelstein’s concise book is considered essential. Chirelstein can be read in one night and after you’ve finished, you will just “get” contracts law. It gives you a great overview of the full…

Previous Next Law school is absolute hell on the back. Between lugging around massive tomes (casebooks) and spending most of the time hunched over a desk, you’re going to suffer a bit. If I was a chiropractor or a massage therapist I would, with zero hesitation, set up shop next to a big law school. One of the best ways for law students to reduce the strain is invest in a serious backpack. The Sisyphean task of carrying your laptop and books to and fro everyday gets a lot easier if you are properly equipped. In this post we give…

In almost every law school, you are graded on a strict curve. In this article, we break down the details of the law school curve and analyze why the dreaded curve causes so many law students to break into a cold sweat. Curved Grading Most of us are familiar with the concept of a curve: it means grades must fall along a predetermined distribution. In a true curve-graded class, the exact number of As, Bs, Cs etc. is set ahead of time and students’ scores must be made to fit into those pre-determined allotments. Typically, this supposed to follow what is a called a normal distribution,…

This year’s law school application cycle is in full swing, and as students move from law school application mode to 1L prep mode, we always get a flood of questions regarding the transition into law school. Our previous posts on the best books to prepare for law school and our list of recommended reading for the summer before law school were a hit, so this year we’re going to dive deeper into more topics on how to prepare for law school. Today, I take a look at one of the questions that I’m asked most frequently: Do I Need Know What Area of…

When it comes to law school electives, some, it seems, are much more useful than others (from a big law firm’s perspective anyways). In a study published last week by Harvard Law professors John C. Coates IV, Jesse M. Fried, and Kathryn E. Spier sought to answer the question, “which law school classes should you take?” by asking 124 attorneys at eleven elite firms to rate the “usefulness” of various Harvard Law classes. The answer makes me feel better about avoiding constitutional law classes (UChicago, blessedly, doesn’t require them).

Here we list the best movies of all time related to the law, including the only two films that really place law school itself front and center. If you asked screenwriters to name the top ten least interesting settings for a movie, I bet law school would make the list. It’s after law school that, in fiction at least, lawyers become interesting. That said, a few movies have managed to make learning the law into something worth filming, and we’ve got ’em on the list. The rest are about lawyers, who everyone knows make great movie material. With that in mind,…

*Not an actual law school at Christmas Wondering what to get the law student in your life? We can help with that. We were both law students not so long ago, and there is one thing that any and all future lawyers need help with around the holiday season: reducing stress. Trust me. Finals just finished. Soon enough, your poor law student has to march back to school and go through all of that again. Any gift that makes the next semester less stressful is going to be just the thing they need. With that in mind, we’ve listed some…

As a former law student myself, I hate the cliche that law students love to argue. If you look around at people, just about all of them love to argue. Law students aren’t any worse. In fact, if you are one of these very argumentative types, I suggest you take it down fives notches before you apply to law school (check out what the Yale Law Admissions dean had to say on this– if you are an argumentative law wonk, she’s not impressed). What law students do like, however, is sounding smart. You probably won’t get any of them to…

Remembering things for any test is hard, but keeping track of all the cases you’ll learn in torts is going to be one of the toughest tests of your memory you face in law school. How do you memorize torts cases in a way so that you don’t forget that key case come exam day? Because torts was my best subject 1L year, I wanted to share with you my strategy for getting a great grade. Here’s what I found to be the best way to memorize torts cases: Step 1: Outline You have to outline for every subject and…

Lawyers (and future lawyers) love jargon. It might seem like half the of the words on the law school forums are in code, so here is a list to help you understand law school lingo. We don’t promise learning any of this will make you cooler (in fact, it may do just the opposite), however, if you want into the legal world this is the entry level terminology you have to know to understand what people are talking about. Here is a list of law school, LSAT prep, and law school admissions acronyms to help you on your way:

It can be very intimidating being a law student and trying to talk to your law professors. I know many of you have seen the movie Paper Chase. You will develop a fascination with some of your professors and want to get to know them better- it’s part of the law school culture. However, the Paper Chase approach, sleeping with the professor’s daughter, can lead to unnecessary complications. Here, we tell you how to approach law professors in non-harassing ways.

The idea for this post came from another blog, but I wanted to share my thoughts about some smart things to do when you start law school. Law school is a fresh start, and you can improve yourself and your habits to make 1L year a lot easier. 1. Behave At Least Halfway Like An Adult Yes, dancing on the bar was a socially sound decision in undergrad. In law school, do too much acting out right when you start the first term, and you’ll get a reputation that it takes until 3L year to repair. Take it from someone…

I’m sure you aren’t the only one who has wondered “what does of counsel mean?” because I wondered that too when I was a budding lawyer. Aside from the fact that it sounds ungrammatical, there is nothing in the term “of counsel” to give you a clue as to its meaning. Lawyers, you will learn, loves using archaic terms for things so that laypeople have no idea what they are talking about. “Of counsel’, one of these mysterious law firm terms, simply means a lawyer who is employed by a firm to do work but is not an associate or…

Law school usually means it’s time to get a new computer- your one from undergrad is on its last legs and you can’t risk crashes and lost notes. Plus, I think we all can admit that buying a laptop is a lot of fun. Your financial aid package will generally have a laptop allowance where you can borrow up to $1,500 extra to get a computer, more than enough to get a great laptop for law school. Consider it a nice present to yourself for getting into law school 🙂 Without further ado, here are the best laptops for law school:

The title Esquire (often abbreviated as “Esq.) is a term typically used in the United States to designate a person who may practice law. The title Esquire, which may apply to a man or a woman, goes after the name of the person. So I could say: “hello, this is Joshua Craven, Esquire.” This modern meaning employed in the United States is very different from the original meaning of the word “esquire,” which originally meant an apprentice to a Knight who was aspiring to noble rank (it is a cognate of ‘squire’). In America, where noble titles are constitutionally forbidden,…

There was a time when law school was an excellent default option for very bright individuals who didn’t have any other ideas about what to do with their life. Rather than asking themselves “why do I want to be a lawyer?” they probably just thought, correctly, that they could do a whole lot worse, and off to school they went. While this probably made for a lot of unhappy lawyers, at least they had enough money for alcohol, so everything was okay. Now, everything has changed. The legal economy was very fragile during the great recession. As a result, media…

The following interview is with a student who managed to succeed in a highly competitive environment at Cornell Law, one of the elite top 14 law schools in the country. When all grades were in, this student placed in the top 10% of their class 1L year. I find many 0Ls enter law school with a desire to excel but no idea what do to get there. Hopefully the advice in this interview will set you on the right path. Bear in mind that this represents just one person’s strategy for getting good grades. Many strategies work well, but you have…

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