Browsing: Logic Games

Conditional reasoning is a common feature of the LSAT, tested heavily in both the logic games and logical reasoning sections. While the term ‘conditional reasoning’ is a little intimidating, it’s important to realize that you already understand these logical relationships intuitively and use them in your daily speech. In this post we deal with every aspect of conditional reasoning needed for the LSAT, including the basics of if-then statements, making simple inferences, avoiding common mistakes, how to deal with conjunctions in a conditional statement, and how to spot and diagram conditional statements that are often deliberately obscure or confusing on…

This lesson comes from our Mastermind Study Group, which is now underway. Here’s how it works: you self-study (cheap!) but Josh and I guide you every step of the way with live coaching and lessons. Check it out HERE For our first part of the webinar on “diagramming considerations,” I wanted to take a look at some of the sneakiest, meanest, most insidious rules that you see on the LSAT. In the conditional logic lessons, we’ve gotten pretty used to handling conditional statements. If you spot the word “if” and “then”, I’m pretty confident that you understand that you are dealing…

Hi all, here are some more free explanations from modern tests, which we are giving you just because we are nice guys. This test can be found in Actual Official LSAT Preptests Volume V, the compilation of ten brand new LSAT preptests that LSAC recently published. If you are just starting out, don’t do these preptests. They should be saved for the end of your prep when the exam is approaching. That said, they are totally necessary study material, so you will have to grab a copy sooner or later. Fortunately, it’s way cheaper than buying them all individually. Now, on…

Today we have complete logic games explanations for PT 63 Section 2. Game 1, Game 2, Game 3, and Game 4. This is the second preptest in the recently published compilation 10 Actual, Official, LSAT Preptests Volume V, which contains PT 62 to 71. The techniques us should be similar enough to prep books we recommend (The Logic Games Bible and the Blueprint for Logic Games), such that you won’t feel totally out of water watching these.

Here are video LG explanations for PT 62, Section 3, Game 1, Game 2, Game 3, and Game 4. This is the first preptest from the recently published compilation 10 Actual, Official, LSATs Volume V, which covers PT 62 to 71. This is obviously essential practice, so even if you have a lot of older tests still left to do before June, make sure you get these PTs done before test day. If you bought most of them before Volume V came out but are missing a couple, here’s where you can find them.

Here are logic games explanations for Preptest 29 Game 1, Game 2, Game 3, and Game 4. These are found in the Next 10 Actual Official LSAT Preptests. I did this preptest by request, as a reader really wanted to see the game 2 setup. I wasn’t surprised, because this “mannequins” game is a candidate for hardest game ever, and it’s one that almost always trips people up. Check out the setup below and you’ll see why it’s considered a killer game.

Here is a video logic games explanation for Preptest 7 (February 1993), Section 2, Game 4. If you are doing this whole section, here are the Game 1, Game 2, and Game 3 explanations. This preptest is the first in the compilation 10 Actual Official LSAT Preptests. This fourth game is a moderately difficult advanced linear game. Once you make a key inference, there isn’t much left to do. Practice building your intuition by trying it out. Hint: The block formed by combining rule 2 with rule 3 might not be able to fit in many places). Do it on your own…

Here is a logic games explanation for Preptest 7 (February 1993), Section 2, Game 3. This is a somewhat tricky grouping game with a weird rule that can put you on the defensive. However, if you stay confident with your setup and diagram the rules visually, the solutions should come quickly. Try it before watching the review. This game can be found in the first preptest from your 10 Actual Official LSAT Preptests, a compilation of ten preptests which is where you should generally begin when you start doing real LSAT questions. Here, we use techniques similar to those found…

Here is another video games explanation, this time for Game 2 from the February 1993 LSAT (Preptest 7). This one is much harder than this morning’s warm-up game (Game 1, Preptest 7). It’s an advanced linear game with a bit of a wrinkle in the setup that you have to watch for. This game has a few pretty tricky inferences that you could potentially spot while doing the inference. However, I don’t think even a great test taker would see them then. When you watch a lot of these LSAT game explanations, the video author always makes these super hard inferences…

We are starting a series of free video explanations for Logic Games. Today’s is a warm-up type of game, a very easy one from the first preptest in the 10 Actual, Official LSAT Preptests book (Click here to save it to an Amazon shopping cart). This is Game 1 of Preptest 7. Here we are using techniques from the Powerscore Logic Games Bible. We will also be doing videos using techniques in our other favorite LSAT prep book, The LSAT Trainer, so look out for those as well. This is the kind of game you want to shoot for doing in…

This is the first in a series of question and answer posts that we are planning to do in order to answer reader questions that are pertinent to many LSAT prep students. This reader is still having difficulty with logic games even after extensive prep with a solid LSAT company. It’s a pretty common problem, one we’ll attempt to solve with some good advice and a funny cat video. Our reader writes in: Hey Evan. I took the test in Dec after prepping with 7sage, I was happy in that I was scoring in the 160s but my aim was…

When you start out attacking LSAT logic games, basic linear games (sometimes also called ordering or sequencing games) is where you should start. Here, in a completely free, comprehensive lesson, we’ll cover some of the most effective basic techniques. The goal is to give yourself a powerful way to visualize these games so that you can do them really, really quickly without placing undue strain on the brain. If you are starting out learning logic games or you are struggling with linear games techniques, bookmark this page now. Learn this stuff and you’ll be well on your way to mastering…

The Best LSAT Logic Games Strategies In this post we discuss the best LSAT logic games strategies learned from my own LSAT prep and my time as a professional LSAT tutor and classroom instructor. This approach helped me, and later many of my students, go from being unable to finish logic games sections to getting perfect or near perfect scores consistently on LG during simulated practice tests. Get to that point and doing it on test day is matter of routine. I ended up scoring -1 for LG on my actual test.

People knock on trial and error as a strategy for attacking a logic games questions and generally, yes, it’s a last-ditch option. However, it’s happens: you get to a question and your saying “wtf, I have no idea how to do this!” and trial and error is your only remaining option. In this post, we discuss how to use trial and error correctly so you don’t get stuck or waste too much time on really tough questions.

Overall Rating: 180 out of 180 (A perfect score!) PowerScore® LSAT Logic Games Bible- Revised 2013 Edition The PowerScore® LSAT Logic Games Bible has long been the LSAT prep book most frequently recommended by top scorers to prepare for the notoriously tricky logic games section of the LSAT. Now, PowerScore has revised the book with more 228 pages of new material, including new drills, more logic games for practice, and expanded discussion of some of the key concepts. MY SHORT REVIEW: This book give you a straight-forward, fundamentally correct approach for doing the logic games section quickly and accurately. You…

The LSAT Logic games section is the section that most people find the most difficult when starting out LSAT prep. Whereas most of us have honed our reading and critical thinking skills considerably over the years, it’s less often that we’ve been asked to group campers in two canoes when there are crazy rules about which campers can go together. Fortunately, the logic games section is also the most teachable part of the LSAT and the easiest to develop true consistency on. Here we give you a bunch of tips and tricks that will help you on your way to…

LSAT PREP BOOK REVIEWS: The Blueprint For LSAT Logic Games SCORE: 178 out of 180 Review Summary: Blueprint, long known as reputable company providing high quality LSAT prep courses, has released a huge book on how to do LSAT games and it is glorious. The easy to understand material is written with plenty of humor to make it go down easily and contains ample drills and practice questions. Carefully crafted to teach you step by step without any big jumps, this is a first rate, comprehensive option for those learning LSAT logic games through self-study. However, people in a hurry…

What is the best way to improve my LSAT Logic Games score? I have recently been taking timed preptests and although the other sections aren’t perfect, I always get through them with time to spare. For the Logic Games section, however, I am always pressed for time and can never finish. I am getting overwhelmed and need help knowing what to do to increase Logic Games skills and score higher on the LG section! The Analytical Reasoning section of the LSAT (lovingly referred to as the logic games or LG section) can certainly be a huge pain in the ass.

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