LSAC publishes score percentiles for each scaled score measured over a three year period (your scaled score is the one people mean when they say “my LSAT score is __.” It’s some number between 120-180, but hopefully, for you, it will be closer to 180). These percentile scores can help you assess your strength by showing you roughly how rare each score is. The percentile numbers in the chart below indicate the percentage of people that scored below that score in that three years measured. So for 165 for example, 91.4 percent of takers got below that score in the period 2009-2012.

Without further ado, here is the chart:

Scaled Score 2005–2008 2006–2009 2007–2010 2008–2011 2009–2012
180 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9
179 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9 99.9
178 99.8 99.8 99.9 99.9 99.9
177 99.7 99.7 99.8 99.8 99.8
176 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.6 99.7
175 99.5 99.5 99.4 99.4 99.5
174 99.3 99.2 99.2 99.2 99.3
173 99.0 99.0 99.0 99.0 98.9
172 98.6 98.6 98.6 98.6 98.6
171 98.1 98.1 98.0 98.0 98.0
170 97.5 97.5 97.4 97.3 97.2
169 96.8 96.8 96.7 96.6 96.5
168 96.0 96.1 95.9 95.7 95.6
167 95.1 94.9 94.6 94.2 94.2
166 93.4 93.4 93.2 93.1 92.9
165 92.2 92.1 92.0 91.5 91.4
164 90.7 90.4 90.0 89.7 89.5
163 88.5 88.5 88.1 87.6 87.4
162 86.3 86.3 85.9 85.5 85.1
161 84.0 83.9 83.4 82.9 82.5
160 81.5 81.0 80.4 79.9 79.9
159 78.0 78.0 77.6 77.4 76.9
158 75.1 75.1 74.6 74.1 73.6
157 72.0 71.6 70.9 70.4 70.3
156 68.3 67.9 67.4 66.9 66.7
155 64.2 64.2 63.9 63.7 63.3
154 60.0 60.0 59.7 59.8 59.8
153 56.1 55.8 55.6 55.6 55.6
152 52.9 52.6 52.2 51.7 51.6
151 48.6 48.3 48.1 47.7 47.9
150 44.4 44.1 44.3 44.2 44.4
149 40.0 40.2 40.3 40.3 40.2
148 36.3 36.3 36.3 36.3 36.6
147 32.9 32.5 33.0 33.1 33.6
146 29.6 29.6 29.5 29.5 29.9
145 26.2 25.8 26.1 26.3 26.7
144 23.1 22.8 22.9 23.1 23.6
143 20.2 20.3 20.5 20.4 20.6
142 17.5 17.4 17.8 17.9 18.3
141 15.2 15.0 15.2 15.3 15.7
140 13.0 13.0 13.4 13.4 13.7
139 11.1 11.2 11.4 11.5 11.7
138 9.3 9.3 9.6 9.8 9.9
137 7.8 7.9 8.1 8.3 8.5
136 6.5 6.6 6.7 6.9 7.0
135 5.5 5.5 5.6 5.7 6.0
134 4.5 4.6 4.7 4.7 4.8
133 3.6 3.6 3.7 3.8 4.0
132 3.1 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.3
131 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7
130 1.9 1.9 2.0 2.0 2.1
129 1.6 1.6 1.7 1.7 1.8
128 1.2 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.4
127 1.0 1.0 1.0 1.1 1.1
126 0.8 0.8 0.8 0.9 0.9
125 0.6 0.6 0.7 0.7 0.7
124 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.5 0.6
123 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.4 0.5
122 0.3 0.3 0.4 0.3 0.4
121 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3 0.3
120 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0

Looking at LSAT percentile scores gives you a good way to understand why exactly high scorers are in demand at law schools. 170-180 seems like a big range of numbers but, if you look below at the chart, you see that a tiny fraction of the total test takers hit that score range- only 2.8% of takers in the year of LSAT takers in the last three years did so. The best law schools are trying to pull applicants mostly from this tiny batch of scorers at the top.

As you get in the very best scores, you see that these scores are incredibly rare. My co-blogger Josh Craven’s score of 177, for example, put him in the top .2 percent of scorers for that period (2008-2011).

You might also have noticed that the numbers are shifting a little. In most areas of the chart, a greater percentage of LSAT takers are achieving higher numbers, possibly because test takers are putting in more effort preparing with each subsequent year.

Remember that the LSAT is not actually a curved test. There doesn’t have to be any set percentage of people getting any given score. This means that everyone taking it could theoretically get above a 150 if only very strong takers took a specific administration of the test. Instead of being curved, the LSAT is actually statistically equated. In plain English, that means they try to make a given score just as challenging to get on each test. So if people are better prepared than in previous years, the percentiles are going to change a little bit.

We here at LSI implore you not to get to hung up on the numbers and stats. The most important thing is that you get the highest score that you can achieve. Remember that by following a rigorous prep schedule you will be preparing more than the vast majority of takers, which increases your chances of being at the top of this chart. See our recommended schedule here to get an idea of what it looks like to undertake the sort of rigorous prep we had to work though to earn a 173 (Evan) and 177 (Josh).

Best of luck and follow us on twitter @onlawschool for more stats and LSAT prep tips.

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