Browsing: Logical Reasoning

In this lesson, we discuss proper timing (pacing) strategy for the LSAT logical reasoning section. Remember that this is a benchmark to eventually shoot for. In the first phase of your prep, you should spend a considerable amount of time learning how to do LR problems untimed. Later, after you are feeling confident with the various question types, argument structure, and deductive and inductive reasoning, you can begin to think about working under time pressure. Most people find that when they start timing LR sections, they are unable to finish the section in the allotted 35 minutes. This is normal.…

Joshua Craven and Evan Jones are proud to introduce The Lawschooli.com Logical Reasoning Course! Knowing logical reasoning is all-important—half of your score on the LSAT will be determined by how well you can solve logical reasoning questions. To that end, we have built what we guarantee the most in-depth resource available for teaching the logical reasoning section. Our goal with this course is simple. No shortcuts and half-measures. No oversimplification. The goal is to get you understand logic and problem structure on exactly the same level as the people who are making this test. If you have taken an LSAT exam…

Your ability to attack the LSAT logical reasoning section will decide half of your score on the LSAT. HALF YOUR SCORE! It is all-important to your success on this exam. So what separates the bulk of LSAT takers, who never get more than around half of the problems they attack correct, from those who consistently miss just 0-3 on this section? (This is the range you want to be in to get a 170+ score on the LSAT.) To explore this topic, we hosted a special Wednesday Webinar: MASTERING THE LSAT LOGICAL REASONING SECTION. Our webinars are always free to…

Conditional reasoning is a common feature of the LSAT, tested heavily in both the logic games and logical reasoning sections. While the term ‘conditional reasoning’ is a little intimidating, it’s important to realize that you already understand these logical relationships intuitively and use them in your daily speech. In this post we deal with every aspect of conditional reasoning needed for the LSAT, including the basics of if-then statements, making simple inferences, avoiding common mistakes, how to deal with conjunctions in a conditional statement, and how to spot and diagram conditional statements that are often deliberately obscure or confusing on…

I hope I’m not going to say anything too controversial here, but the reality that most people don’t see big improvements on logical reasoning. It’s not your fault, really. You are just incompetent. Before you click away because whoa, I just said something really mean, hear me out for a second. Almost everyone starts out their path to logical reasoning mastery totally incompetent, so chances are you are totally incompetent too. The problem is that you don’t even realize it! You may even think you are pretty good, and actually, you’re not wrong. So how can you be pretty good…

Sometimes, it’s tough for me to remember what it was like to begin studying for the LSAT. At first, the whole thing was totally foreign to me. In recognition of that, we wanted to do a post for those just starting out learning logical reasoning (LR) in order to help you get a hold on the fundamentals of the section. Heads up, this will cover pretty basic info, so those of you who have some LSAT experience might want to scan to the bottom to find our posts on more advanced LR topics.

Learning how to spot and critique flaws is the single most important skill that you need to develop in order to succeed on the LSAT logical reasoning section. We are all good at spotting and critiquing flaws in real life. With LSAT flaws, however, we are not talking about your ex’s habit of leaving dishes around your apartment or anything like that. LSAT flaws are very specific. When the LSAT tells you something is flawed, that means there is an error in the reasoning. What does it mean to say that there is an error in the reasoning? All arguments have at…

LSAT LR questions often make arguments. They run the gamut from persuasive and logically valid to misguided and flawed. As an LSAT taker, you need to become an expert critic. You need to be combative, incisive, and quick on your feet. One of the essential features of argumentation, both on the LSAT and in life, is arguing from the general to the specific– from principles, to actual instances. In today’s lesson, we are going to take a very close look at the topic of speaking broadly, i.e. using principles. While LSAT instructors and students often refer to certain LR questions as “principle…

Continuing our series of posts handling various logical reasoning question types, today we look at LR “Explain the Discrepancy” questions, also known as “Resolve The Paradox” questions. These questions are by no means the most frequent opponent you will engage with on the LR section — an average test contains just a few of them between the two LR sections. Still, that’s no reason to take your task in learning these lightly. Points are points as I always say. Here is how to solve these questions with hardly any effort.

If you are having trouble with logical reasoning point at issue questions (also called “disagreement” or “identify the disagreement” questions), you are likely getting distracted too much by thinking about argument structure, or you are falling for crafty wrong answers. We can help you. In point at issue questions, you have two arguments that intersect, two authors who disagree on something. You have to figure out what exactly they disagree over. This sounds easy, but the LSAT lays a lot of traps.

LSAT logical reasoning “method of reasoning” questions (also sometimes called “method of argument” questions) are one of the more minor question types on the LSAT LR section. You’ll never see more than two in a given LR section, and sometimes there aren’t any. However, each one you encounter is still worth the same amount of points as other questions, so they deserve some respect. That said, I think most good LSAT takers view these as easy points, and you should too. They are also a good one to aim to solve quickly, in order to pick up time that can be used…

Okay, last time we discussed necessary assumption questions, so today we move on to their close cousin, LSAT logical reasoning justify questions, also known as sufficient assumption questions. These questions are good way to test where you are with understanding logical reasoning. If you have a good solid grasp on conditional reasoning, they should be fairly manageable. If you don’t, they are a real pain. The big key is that you understand what a sufficient assumption is and how it differs from necessary assumptions. This way, you can spot a sufficient assumption and mark down the correct answer quickly. In…

LSAT necessary assumption questions are probably the logical reasoning (LR) question type that is most difficult to master. I found early in my practice that when I went to score a practice section, at least one wrong answer was an assumption question. A ton of people report this same problem. Even when you have a thorough understanding of these questions, it’s easy to make mistakes. Through a lot of effort I was able to zero in on these questions and get so I was nearly 100% accurate on them. I want to help you do the same. First we’ll talk…

LSAT logical reasoning strengthen questions are very similar to the weaken questions we covered last time, but instead of trying to kick the argument over, you are trying to keep it up. Unlike with weaken questions, where we try to show that the conclusion may not follow from the premises, with LR strengthen questions your goal is to really nail the conclusion on the premises tightly. Remember our house metaphor: an argument is like a house — the conclusion is the roof, and it’s held up by the premises. With strengthen questions, you look for an answer choice that makes that…

In case you didn’t notice, we are taking you through strategies for specific LSAT logical reasoning question types. We just covered ‘main point’ questions a few days ago. Today, we’ll talk about LSAT logical reasoning “weaken” questions, another one of the major question types you’ll encounter on the LSAT LR section. Out of the 50 or so LR questions you’ll do on an LSAT, weaken questions usually make up about 10% of the questions. Think you are good at picking apart arguments? It’s time to prove it. Being good at the LSAT LR section means that you can see weak spots in…

Mastering LSAT logical reasoning main point questions is, along with learning ‘must be true questions’, the first thing you should do to attack the LR section. I want you to think of main point questions in two ways: First, they are relatively easy points. Good LSAT takers should be able to answer them, on average, faster than many other question types. Second, be aware that main point question form the basis for your understanding of other question types, especially strengthen and weaken. Focus on mastering them so you can approach other questions types effectively.

Parallel reasoning questions suck, I won’t dispute that. However, they are beatable. I’m going to teach you how to make peace with them and even benefit a lot from solving these bad boys. Some common advice for those who have trouble finishing the LR section on time is to just skip parallel reasoning questions. That’s fine advice. They are typically among the more time consuming questions, so skipping them frees up time to get easier points elsewhere. You can always come back to them at the end if you have extra time (do not, however, forget to mark a guess…

You’ve probably already realized that logical reasoning questions make up half your total score on the LSAT. It’s critical that you have this section mastered if you want a high score. Thankfully, the logical reasoning section of the LSAT is very teachable. Start off your LSAT prep with the best logical reasoning prep books to give yourself a proper foundation to reach a high LSAT score.

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