Browsing: Law School Exams

UPDATED FOR 2018-2019! Glannon Guide to Torts: Learning Torts Through Multiple-Choice Questions and Analysis The most commonly recommended supplement for 1L torts class is Glannon’s Guide to Torts. It’s best thought of as a concise version of the E&E and while it will be very useful for exam study, it’s also a great pre-class primer. Glannon is THE MAN when it comes to 1L exam prep, so he also wrote the E&E for torts. As such, getting both of these might be a little redundant. Also, let’s face it, the E&E is often too long to work through all the…

Civil procedure is usually offered during your first semester of 1L year, so it’s where many students first get acquainted with legal reasoning. At my school, UChicago, where we were on the quarter system, Civ Pro 1 was one of only two exams we had our first quarter. As such, all of us over-studied horribly for it, because we didn’t yet know where to say enough is enough. Despite consulting a lot of resources, my study group agreed that only a couple of the supplements we checked were outstanding. Here are the best civ pro supplements: Civil Procedure: Examples and Explanations (Examples…

Chirelstein’s Concepts and Case Analysis in the Law of Contracts There is no disagreement among law students about this: the best contract law supplement is Chirelstein’s Concepts and Case Analysis in the Law of Contracts (more often referred too as just “Chirelstein” or, “the book with the sailboat”). Whereas in other subjects the examples and explanations series of supplements is often the only way to go, for contracts Chirelstein’s concise book is considered essential. Chirelstein can be read in one night and after you’ve finished, you will just “get” contracts law. It gives you a great overview of the full…

In almost every law school, you are graded on a strict curve. In this article, we break down the details of the law school curve and analyze why the dreaded curve causes so many law students to break into a cold sweat. Curved Grading Most of us are familiar with the concept of a curve: it means grades must fall along a predetermined distribution. In a true curve-graded class, the exact number of As, Bs, Cs etc. is set ahead of time and students’ scores must be made to fit into those pre-determined allotments. Typically, this supposed to follow what is a called a normal distribution,…

WHAT ARE LAW SCHOOL EXAMS LIKE? One word: Hard. You can debate all day about whether anything else in academia is harder, but I’m here to tell you that law school exams are just plain tough. Basically, when you study for and take a law school exam, you are entering gladiatorial combat with 100 or so other people who are just as bright and motivated as you, and just about all of them are looking for a tiny edge anywhere they can get it to do well on the test.